theredbatman asked: Almost Human had/has a more coherent, and noticeable, season long arc that got ruined by fox airing the episodes of out order(if i remember correctly, the second episode aired is episode eight in continuity). It also was meant to have more episodes in the season, which would have been more open to developing plot

That actually makes me feel a lot better; not because it makes it any better, but because it means that Fox strikes again so, like—it’s not the show’s fault.

It’s always fascinating to me that literally any even halfway decent sci-fi show on Fox gets all screwed up and then canceled. What’s even more fascinating is that they had X-Files, so it’s almost like “welp, this isn’t an instant X-F; axe it.”

I think Rachael and I had this conversation right at the beginning. “Ooo robots! Oh, it’s on Fox. Sigh.”



Posted on March 12, 2014 10:18PM (1 month ago) with 1 note


Almost Human, or: What do you mean that’s the Season Finale?

Well, first off, I didn’t realize Almost Human was a short season show. If I’d known that I would have been less than glowing with my opinion of the way episodes were handled. The ultimate problem becomes that Fox has tried to straddle the line between extremely lucrative yet bland Police Procedural and Cult Sci-Fi show. Now, I’ll admit that robots and cyberpunk certainly makes a police procedural more watchable—at least for me—but once you throw in those robots and cyberpunk you get a completely different animal. Science Fiction runs on mytharcs. There’s nothing wrong with episodes that are unrelated cases—those are often refreshing (and in weirder circles are referred to as “Monster of the Week” episodes) but the Almost Human pilot promised me some sort of arc. There’s Kennex’s mysterious ex-girlfriend, there’s some sort of criminal underground, there’s a plethora of things that have the appearance of plot and the promise of mytharc that are either unsatisfactorily glanced upon in a MotW episode or forgotten altogether.

Ganking the atmosphere of science fiction is a mistake if you’re not going to follow through with what science fiction fans would expect. I know that I personally wouldn’t willingly sit through a series of unconnected-but-shiny crime stories without thinking there was going to be some sort of larger plot payoff.

Weekly crimes and no mytharc whatsoever left me very suddenly cold when I slammed into the “Season Finale” completely off-guard. If that’s all we get it needed a plot and it needed to be tighter. As it is, Almost Human was just your average procedural but with flashy lights.



Posted on March 12, 2014 8:34PM (1 month ago) with 7 notes


Artist: Fleetwood Mac
Track: Say You Love Me
Album: Fleetwood Mac - Greatest Hits
185 plays
Posted on March 9, 2014 7:57PM (1 month ago) with 17 notes § via - source


I’ve noticed a trend in my contemporary vampire fiction lately and that trend is that the audience is often offered up a contrasting pair of male vampires: a more subdued and somber dark haired one and a blond with varying degrees of ruthlessness or dark whimsy.

I invariably go for the blond. Every time.



Posted on March 9, 2014 11:35AM (1 month ago) with 1 note


Artist: Lorde
Track: Royals
Album: Pure Heroine
22,811 plays

jamsoftheday:

we’re bigger than we ever dreamed
and i’m in love with being queen
life is game without a care
we aren’t caught up in your love affair

Posted on March 9, 2014 11:31AM (1 month ago) with 3,429 notes § via - source


Pre-Dracula Vampire Literature Masterpost Part II: 1850 - 1897

a-tundra-toadstool:

1850-1859

  • Le Vampire (The Vampire) by Alexandre Dumas (1851) [Cadytech.com]
  • La Baronne Trépassée (The Dead Baroness aka The Vampire and the Devil’s Son) by Pierre Alexis Ponson du Terrail. (1852) [Ebooksgratuits.com - French PDF] [Black Coat Press - English Translation ($)]
  • "Le Vampire" ("The Vampire") by Charles-Pierre Baudelaire (1857) [Fleursdemal.org - Multiple Translations] [Poemhunter.com]
  • "Quetait-ce?" ("What Was It?") by Fitz-James O’Brien (1859) [University of Adelaide] [Bartelby.com] (not explicitly about vampires, although it does concern a creature that bites sleeping people)

1860-1869

  • Le Chevalier Tenebre (The Shadow Knight aka Knightshade) by Paul Henri Corentin Féval (1860) [Black Coat Press - English Translation ($)]
  • "The Mysterious Stranger" by Anonymous (1860) [The Literary Gothic]
  • "The Cold Embrace" by Mary Elizabeth Braddon (1860) [GoogleBooks] [Gaslight]
  • "Les Métamorphoses du vampire" ("Metamorphosis of a  Vampire") by Charles-Pierre Baudelaire (1860) [Fleursdemal.org - Multiple Translations]
  • Le Vampire Du Val-de-Grace (The Vampire of the Val-de-Grace) by Leon Gozlan (1861) [GoogleBooks - French] [Archive.org - French] [Black Coat Press - English Translation ($)]
  • Spirite: A Fantasy by Théophile Gautier (1861) [GoogleBooks] [Wikisource - French] (not explicitly about vampires, although it does concern the re-arisen dead)
  • La Vampire (The Vampire aka The Vampire Countess) by Paul Henri Corentin Féval (1865) [Project Gutenberg - French] [Black Coat Press - English Translation ($)]
  • La Ville-Vampire (Vampire City) by Paul Henri Corentin Féval (1867) [Archive.org - French] [Black Coat Press - English Translation ($)] (apparently features Gothic author Ann Radcliff as a vampire hunter)
  • "The Last Lords of Gardonal" by William Gilbert (1867) [GoogleBooks: Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3] [Gaslight]

1870-1879

1880-1889

1890-1897


Part I [x]

Adapted from this forum post. Original poster has not read all works listed, but has applied descriptive/helpful notes where possible.



Posted on March 9, 2014 11:31AM (1 month ago) with 589 notes § via - source


Pre-Dracula Vampire Literature Masterpost Part I: pre-1880s - 1849

a-tundra-toadstool:

Before 1800

1800-1819

1820-1829

1830-1839

1840-1849

  • Der tote Gast (The Dead Guest) by Heinrich Zschokke (1840) [GoogleBooks] (not explicitly about vampires, although it does concern the re-arisen dead)
  • Upyr (The Vampire) by Aleksey Konstantinovich Tolstoy (1841) [Az.lib.eu - Russian] [Amazon.com - English Translation ($)]
  • 'The Vampire” by James Clerk Maxwell (1845) [GoogleBooks] [Poemhunter.com]
  • Varney the Vampyre, or, The Feast of Blood by James Malcolm Rhymer (sometimes attributed to Thomas Preskett Prest) (1845-1847) [University of Virgina] [Project Gutenberg - Incomplete]
  • Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte (1847) [GoogleBooks] [Archive.org] [Project Gutenberg] (not explicitly about vampires, although Heathcliff is accused of vampirsm)
  • "La Dame pâle" ("The Pale Lady," aka "The Carpathian Mountains"; "The Vampire of the Carpathian Mountains") by Alexandre Dumas and Paul Bobage, in Les mille et un fantômes (The Thousand and One Ghosts) (1849) [Project Gutenberg - French] [Wikisource - French] [Amazon.com - English Translation ($)]

Part II [x]

Adapted from this forum post. Original poster has not read all works listed, but has applied descriptive/helpful notes where possible.



Posted on March 9, 2014 11:30AM (1 month ago) with 852 notes § via - source


blissfullittlemissleading:

*seduces you with my extensive knowledge of buffy the vampire slayer*



Posted on February 15, 2014 11:46AM (2 months ago) with 4,091 notes § via - source


elvishness:

arya should wear armor at some point of the show, yes? yes


elvishness:

arya should wear armor at some point of the show, yes? yes

Posted on February 15, 2014 11:46AM (2 months ago) with 670 notes § via - source


So, I know I make a post like this about every two months, but I’m going to try to stop being so intimidated by this blog and just write things here. I’m always sort of wary of posting much because the original intention was to create a sort of informal resume, but I think just being my own dorky self would be an even better representation of that. I might even start reblogging fandom stuff—who knows.

Anyway, there was a big snow storm here so things are currently cold yet melting. Hope y’all are all good.



Posted on February 15, 2014 11:37AM (2 months ago) with 1 note